Zion

Matt Rehfeldt

This piece has a Spanish jazz feel to it and features acoustic guitar with celli, bass and percussion.

This idea came to me when I was experimenting with picking arpeggiated chords on acoustic guitar. As it evolved, I added celli, bass and percussion. My brother Andy suggested I add some melodies on top, so I added a "Di Meola" style melody and acoustic guitar solo over the top. When my daughter Malory heard it, she named it Zion after one of the most gorgeous National Parks I've taken her to. Zion was recorded in my home studio in Bellingham, WA. I performed and recorded all the tracks myself. The instrumentation is 2 acoustic steel string guitars, 2 celli, electric bass and percussion. A very special thanks to my ultra talented brother, Andy, who did the final mixing and mastering in his home studio in Chino Hills, CA.

Read more… close
0:00 / ???
  1. 1
    Zion 4:39
    0:00 / 4:39

Two-Part Inventions from J. S. Bach’s Clavier-Büchlein: Adapted for Single-Line Instruments

Matt Rehfeldt & Phillip Rehfeldt

This presentation corresponds with the one in Phillip Rehfeldt's book Guide to Playing Woodwind Instruments, 10th ed., pp. 300-353.

Two-Part Inventions from J. S. Bach’s Clavier-Büchlein: Adapted for Single-Line Instruments

Matthew Rehfeldt (cello) Phillip Rehfeldt (woodwinds)

The Clavier-Büchlein collection was begun in 1720 in Cöthen, where Bach (1685-1750) was employed as Kapellmeister and Director of the Chamber Music to Prince Leopold of Anhalt. The inventions, along with the three-part sinfonias in the same collection, were devised as keyboard-instruction material for his eldest son, Wilhelm Friedemann (1710-1784). There are thirty works in all, fifteen inventions and fifteen sinfonias, each in one of the fifteen mean-tone tempered keys, in the following quasi-palindromic order: C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bm, B-flat, A, Gm, Fm, E, E-flat, D, Cm. Two years later, in Leipzig (1723), Bach recopied the collection with minor musical changes and revised the order of the works to an ascending configuration: C, Cm, D, Dm, E-flat, E, Em, F, Fm, G, Gm, A, Am, B-flat, Bm. Bach’s statement in the forward of the 1723 edition that the purpose includes “how to teach clear playing . . . how to compose good inventions and develope them well . . . and to acquire a taste for the elements of composition,” is important. They are, today, unsurpassed for their pedagogical value and excellence of construction, providing ideal material for single-line instruments as well as keyboard.

Modern editions almost always adhere to the order of the second version. However, the first-version order, the order used in the present edition, is also compelling in that the pieces progress logically in terms of the compositional presentation, ending with an elaborate canon: problems regarding ornamentation are treated in 9, 10 and 11; 5, 7, 9 and 10 are fugues; 12 and 13 make extensive use of medieval stimmtausch (voice exchange). There are also many examples of early (“truncated” or “incipient”) sonata form (1, 2, 6, 8 and 14); 3, 4, 11 and 13 are through composed; and 12 is rounded binary. Bach was teaching principles of composition as well as “clear” keyboard technique. The present edition incorporates the musical changes of the second version, but reinstates the order of the first.

In Bach’s time, “invention” was a term used to describe any short instrumental composition in two-part counterpoint (. . . two independent voices that fit together). The term is most associated with the 1723 version: in the first version, they are called preambulum. Bach’s first requirement of his composition students, according to Karl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788)—Bach’s second (surviving) son—was the invention of ideas. An “invention,” is simply “good ideas.” The ornamentations are as in the table in the 1723 version, the only such table that we have from Bach.- PR

PHILLIP REHFELDT was born in 1939 in Burlington, Iowa and attended public Schools in Freeport, Illinois. His undergraduate and graduate degrees are from the University of Arizona (Tucson), Mount St. Mary’s College (Los Angeles) and a DMA from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor). Applied teachers include Samuel Fain, Kalman Bloch, William Stubbins, Wendal Jones and Manuel Compinsky (chamber music).

Phillip is Emeritus Professor of Woodwind Instruments (Clarinet) and Musicology in the School of Music at the University of Redlands (since 1969). He presently teaches bassoon at California State University, San Bernardino. His solo performances include the Monday Evening Concerts, International Clarinet Clinic/Symposia and ClariNetwork conferences, ASUC regional and national conferences, International Computer-Music Conference, the Schoenberg Institute, Arcosanti Art Festival, Scottsdale Arts Center, the 1980 ISCM in Israel, and beginning in 1974, with Barney Childs, concerts of specially-commissioned works under the title “New Music for Clarinet and Friend.”

Dr. Rehfeldt has appeared with a number of orchestras and ensembles including the Cleveland Chamber Orchestra, the premier of Rudolph Bubalo’s Concerto for Clarinet and Small Orchestra. He has performed locally as principle clarinet/bass clarinet and bassoon with the Redlands Symphony, the Riverside Symphony, the Inland Empire Symphony, the Redlands Bowl Summer Festival Orchestra and, as woodwind doubler, the San Bernardino Civic Light Opera Association. His publications include New Directions for Clarinet (University of California Press, 1977; Scarecrow Press, 1983, 1993) and Guide to Playing Woodwind Instruments (Waveland Press, 1998; MillCreekPublications/Google Play, 2010). He has also published a number of ensemble and pedagogical editions including a six-part clarinet method Study Materials for Clarinet (MillCreekPublications, 1986); The Renaissance Band Book (Shawnee, 1981); Making and Adjusting Single Reeds (MillCreekPublications, 1983, 1991/Google Play); Etudes for the 21st-Century Clarinetist: a Festschrift for Barney Childs on the Occasion of His 50th Birthday from his friends and former students (MillCreekPublications, 1990, 1992, 1993/Google Play). He has recorded over seventy-five works on Advance, Brewster, CRI, Desto, Grenadilla, Roncorp, Edi-Pan, Society of Composers, New World Records, Leonarda, and Zanja labels.

MATTHEW REHFELDT, cellist and guitarist, was born in 1970 into a musical family in Redlands, California. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Redlands with a major in cello performance and a minor in classical guitar. He studied cello with Rick Mooney (pre-college), Joyce Geeting (U of R), Barton Frank (Emeretus Professor of Cello, Western Washington University), Ray Davis (Principal Cello Emeritus, Seattle Symphony) and guitar with Terry Graves (U of R/De Falla Trio). Matthew was honored with the University of Redlands Most Outstanding Performer Award and was also winner of the Redlands Bowl Competition. He has performed as featured soloist with the Whatcom Symphony, the University of Redlands Chamber Orchestra, the Starry Night Orchestra, twice with the Skagit Symphony, including their Opening Night at McIntyre performance, and has performed a concerto at Benaroya Hall in Seattle.

A chamber music enthusiast, Matthew has frequently been featured as soloist and collaborator in the First Sunday at St. Paul's and the Music for a Starry Night concert series', both in Mount Vernon, WA, and the LaConner Institute of Performing Arts concert series. In 2007, Matt was invited to perform as an international soloist and chamber musician in the Monteverde Music Festival in Costa Rica. In 2009, he was featured live performing on cello and guitar for National Public Radio with violinist Anna Schaad. He is a co-founding member of Trio Lumina and founder of the Bach to Rock concert series.

Mr. Rehfeldt has held the post of principal cellist for the Southern California Youth Orchestra, Claremont Young Musicians' Orchestra, University of Redlands Chamber Orchestra, Mancini Symphony of the Desert, Cascade Symphony, Skagit Opera, and is currently principal cellist for the Starry Night Chamber Orchestra. Matt teaches cello and guitar in his private home studio and is currently a freelance cellist and guitarist performing regularly as soloist, principal cellist, classical and rock guitarist and chamber musician throughout Western Washington and abroad. Matt's recordings include a highly acclaimed CD set of all six Bach Suites for Solo Cello, Baroque Concerti on Electric Guitar, Bach to Rock and Bach to Rock 2, all available on CD Baby, Amazon and itunes.

Recorded by Phillip Rehfeldt, Redlands, CA and Matthew Rehfeldt, Bellingham, WA. Edited by Matthew Rehfeldt. Mixed and mastered by Scott Vance in Redlands, CA. Cover art Painting by the late Racheal Rehfeldt (1918-2000) formerly of Lakeside, AZ, (Phillip's Mother/Matthew's Grandmother) . Cover design and graphics by Kimberly Watkins in Los Angelos, CA.

Read more… close

Bach to Rock 2

Matt Rehfeldt

This is my second album to feature music of past celebrated composers and mostly original compositions in many musical styles with meaningful titles.

Matthew Rehfeldt, cellist and guitarist, was born into a musical family. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Redlands with a major in cello performance and a minor in classical guitar. He studied cello with Rick Mooney, Joyce Getting (U of R), Barton Frank, Ray Davis (principal cello emeritus, Seattle Symphony) and guitar with Terry Graves (De Falla Trio). Matthew was honored with the University of Redlands Most Outstanding Performer Award and was also winner of the Redlands Bowl Competition. He has performed as featured soloist with the Whatcom Symphony, the University of Redlands Chamber Orchestra, the Starry Night Orchestra and twice with the Skagit Symphony, including their Opening Night at McIntyre performance. Matt recently performed a concerto at Benaroya Hall in Seattle

A chamber music enthusiast, Matthew has frequently been featured as soloist and collaborator in the First Sunday at St. Paul's and the Music for a Starry Night concert series', both in Mount Vernon, WA, and the LaConner Institute of Performing Arts concert series. In 2007, Matt was invited to perform as an international soloist and chamber musician in the Monteverde Music Festival in Costa Rica. In 2009, he was featured live performing on cello and guitar for National public radio with violinist Anna Schaad. He is a co-founding member of Trio Lumina and founder of the Bach to Rock concert series. 

Mr. Rehfeldt has held the post of principal cellist for the Southern California Youth Orchestra, Claremont Young Musicians' Orchestra, University of Redlands Chamber Orchestra, Mancini Symphony of the Desert, Cascade Symphony, Skagit Opera, and is currently principal cellist for the Starry Night Chamber Orchestra. Matt teaches cello and guitar in his private home studio and is currently a freelance cellist and guitarist performing regularly as soloist, principal cellist, classical and rock guitarist and chamber musician throughout Western Washington and abroad. Matt's recordings include a highly acclaimed CD set of all six Bach Suites for Solo Cello, Baroque Concerti on Electric Guitar, Bach to Rock and Bach to Rock 2, all available on CD Baby, Amazon and itunes.

Read more… close

Bach to Rock

Matt Rehfeldt

"Bach to Rock" is a diverse mixture of different styles of music played on many different instruments by one man, Matt Rehfeldt, including his own arrangements of some well known classics, 6 original works by him, and 1 original by his brother, Andy.

Matt Rehfeldt: cello, guitar, bass, keyboard, percussion, violin and viola

  1. Prelude: Suite for Lute No. 4 BWV 1006a: Composed by J.S. Bach and transcribed for cello by Matt who also added a keyboard bass line.
  2. Gifts from Heaven: Composed by Matt for his daughters Mallory and Shayla, but dedicated to all children.
  3. Song for Kim: Composed by Matt for his gorgeous, supportive, humorous, generous and loving wife, Kim.
  4. The Swan: Composed by Camille Saint-Saëns as the 13th movement of The Carnival of the Animals, originally scored for cello and 2 pianos, here arranged for cello, classical guitar and bass by Matt.
  5. Flight of the Bumble Bee: Composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera Tale of the Tsar Sultan and arranged by Matt for 2 electric guitars, bass and drums.
  6. Damas Country Etude: Composed by Thomas Damas for classical guitar and arranged by Matt with bass and drums in bluegrass style.
  7. The Grand Staircase: Composed by Matt and named after one of the most beautiful places on our planet.
  8. Ode to Chet: Composed by Matt for Chet Atkins and his influence as a great guitarist and human being.
  9. Nessun Dorma: Composed by Giacomo Puccini for his opera Turandot and arranged for 6 celli by Matt.
  10. Motto Perpetuo: Composed by Niccolo Paganini originally for violin and piano, transcribed for cello by J. Klengel and classical guitar by Matt.
  11. Proteus Module: Composed by Andy Rehfeldt originally for his father on flute with recorded keyboard accompaniment by Andy, here with the flute part transcribed for cello with flanger by Matt.
  12. John 3:16: Composed by Matt for the Bible verse (John 3:16) "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life."
  13. Progression in 7: Composed by Matt originally for classical guitar, then arranged with electric guitars, bass and drums with subtle underlying keyboard parts.
  14. Largo from Xerxes: Composed by George Frideric Handel as the opening aria of his 1738 opera Xerxes and arranged for cello and classical guitar by Matt.

Recorded at Rehfeldt Productions Studio in Bellingham, WA. Mixed and mastered by Scott Vance, Redlands, CA. Artwork and graphics by Todd Beringson. © 2015 Rehfeldt Productions.

This CD is dedicated to the Memory of my brother, Steve Rehfeldt (1966-2015).

Matthew Rehfeldt, cellist and guitarist, was born into a musical family. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Redlands with a major in cello performance and a minor in classical guitar. He studied cello with Rick Mooney, Joyce Getting (U of R), Barton Frank, Ray Davis (principal cello emeritus, Seattle Symphony) and guitar with Terry Graves (De Falla Trio). Matthew was honored with the University of Redlands Most Outstanding Performer Award and was also winner of the Redlands Bowl Competition. He has performed as featured soloist with the Whatcom Symphony, the University of Redlands Chamber Orchestra, the Starry Night Orchestra and twice with the Skagit Symphony, including their Opening Night at McIntyre performance. Matt recently performed a concerto at Benaroya Hall in Seattle

A chamber music enthusiast, Matthew has frequently been featured as soloist and collaborator in the First Sunday at St. Paul's and the Music for a Starry Night concert series', both in Mount Vernon, WA, and the LaConner Institute of Performing Arts concert series. In 2007, Matt was invited to perform as an international soloist and chamber musician in the Monteverde Music Festival in Costa Rica. In 2009, he was featured live performing on cello and guitar for National public radio with violinist Anna Schaad. He is a co-founding member of Trio Lumina and founder of the Bach to Rock concert series. 

Mr. Rehfeldt has held the post of principal cellist for the Southern California Youth Orchestra, Claremont Young Musicians' Orchestra, University of Redlands Chamber Orchestra, Mancini Symphony of the Desert, Cascade Symphony, Skagit Opera, and is currently principal cellist for the Starry Night Chamber Orchestra. Matt teaches cello and guitar in his private home studio and is currently a freelance cellist and guitarist performing regularly as soloist, principal cellist, classical and rock guitarist and chamber musician throughout Western Washington and abroad. Matt's recordings include a highly acclaimed CD set of all six Bach Suites for Solo Cello, Baroque Concerti on Electric Guitar and Bach to Rock, all available on CD Baby, Amazon and itunes.

Read more… close
0:00 / ???
  1. 1
    0:00 / 4:58
  2. 2
    0:00 / 5:09
  3. 3
    0:00 / 5:02
  4. 4
    0:00 / 3:30
  5. 5
    0:00 / 1:25
  6. 6
    0:00 / 1:16
  7. 7
    0:00 / 3:51
  8. 8
    0:00 / 3:03
  9. 9
    0:00 / 4:15
  10. 10
    0:00 / 6:21
  11. 11
    0:00 / 6:35
  12. 12
    0:00 / 0:50
  13. 13
    0:00 / 2:52
  14. 14
    0:00 / 2:59

Baroque Concerti On Electric Guitar

Matt Rehfeldt

This is baroque concerti with highly ornamented solo electric guitar and a continuo section of electric bass, classical guitar and cello with violin and viola in the middle, all instruments performed by Matt Rehfeldt.

Matt Rehfeldt

Baroque Concerti on Electric Guitar

Bach, Handel, Vivaldi

Featuring Matt Rehfeldt: electric and classical guitars, violin, viola, cello and electric bass

The period between around 1600-1750 famously known as "Baroque" is one of the most important eras in all of music history largely because of it's three most important composers, Vivaldi, Bach and Handel. It is also the period that the polyphonic-contrapuntal style reached its climax. One of the things that also makes this music so fascinating is that each section of instruments is assigned a different, yet equally important part. The bass part, called "continuo," was equal in importance to the melody, and could have included a harpsichord, organ or lute along with a cello or viola da gamba. For this recording, I used classical guitar and cello, along with electric bass. Another important development of this period was the concerto, a work for solo instrument and orchestra, and concerto grosso or grand concerto, a work for a small group of solo instruments (the pricipale or concertino) against the full orchestra (the repieni or tutti). In this case, I used electric guitar for all parts scored for solo.

Legend has it that the day Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678-1741) was born, there was a tremendous earthquake in Venice. His mother vowed that if they should survive, her son would grow up to become a priest. He was ordained in 1703 which, along with his fiery red hair, lead to his eternal nickname "The Red Priest." However, after one year he quit the practice in order to pursue a career in music like his father, a professional violinist. In September of 1703, he began teaching violin at Ospedale della Pieta, an orphanage in which the boys were taught a trade, and had to leave by age 15, and the girls received a musical education. The most talented of these girls stayed and became members of the Ospedale's famous orchestra and choir. Vivaldi was required to teach the orphans music theory and how to play instruments. He was also required to compose a concerto or an oratorio for every feast. It is here that he most likely composed his Concerto in D major for lute and orchestra which is most commonly done on classical guitar today and, for this recording, electric guitar. One of his contributions to the concerto form, also evident in this concerto, is the development of the slow movement into an equally important movement. Vivaldi later went on to have great success with opera, but even still sent the Ospedale two concerti per month, for which he received two ducats (about $90 U.S. in 2013). He once boasted that he "could compose all the parts of a concerto faster than a copyist could write them out." This is very likely true, for he left us with over 500 concerti, including the notorious programatic Four Seasons concerto for violin and strings.

Unique in all of music history, is the story of the great musical Bach family of Germany that evolved over 200 years producing about 70 professional musicians and composers. It began with the patriarch, Vitus Bach, who played the lute, and climaxed with his great, great grandson, Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), then continued with four of his sons. Like Vivaldi, Bach's father was a professional violinist, and is likely to have taught him violin, harpsichord and music theory. He lost his father at age ten and mother at age nine and went to live with his oldest brother Johann Christoph, who held the organ post at St. Michael's Church in Ohrdruf. From age 18-22, Bach  honed his skills as an organist at a post in Arnstadt, later becoming one of the most respected organists of his lifetime. His son, Carl Phillip Emanuel, once reported that the great French organist, Girolamo Frescobaldi fled a competition with Bach. During his period at Weimar, he played violin, viola and harpsichord in the court orchestra on top of his organ duties. He often directed the orchestra from the viola or harpsichord, his two favorite instruments. His next position was at Kothen where he was employed by Prince Leopold who, himself a musician, treated Bach very well. Here, he wrote most of his solo, chamber and instrumental works, such as the great Brandenburg Concerti and Six Suites for Unaccompanied Cello. It is also here that he may have first composed Oboe Concerto in D minor. He later transcribed it to harpsichord, and also used it in one of his cantatas. For this recording, I have adapted it to the electric guitar. Bach's final period was in Leipzig, where he focused more on church music. A devout Lutheran, he was dedicated to "regulate sacred music to God's honor." On many of his works, the initials S.D.G. are found, which stand for Soli Deo Gloria meaning For the Glory of God Alone.

Born the same year as Bach and only 70 miles away in Halle, George Frideric Handel (1685-1759) never met his great contemporary, although Bach did once walk 20 miles to make the attempt. Unlike Vivaldi and Bach, there were no musicians in Handel's family. In fact, his father wanted him to become a doctor, like himself, and did not approve of the music profession. So young George had to practice in secret. Then, on a visit to the Duke of Saxe-Weisenfels, the boy snuck away from his father and into the chapel and gave an organ performance that greatly impressed the Duke. His father apprehensively recognized his talent and put him in the capable hands of F.W. Zachow (composer, organist and directer of music at the main church of Halle). He studied organ, harpsichord, violin and oboe. By the age of 18, he'd completed studies at the University of Halle and was appointed Cathedral Organist. He soon gave up this post to pursue opera in Hamburg (the center for German Opera of the time) and composed his first opera, Almira, at the age of 19.  In 1706 he moved to Italy and befriended Corelli and Alessandro and Domenico Scarlatti, who's influences were profound. At the age of 25, he was hired as Music Directer at the Electoral Court of Hanover, He eventually enraged the king for spending too much time in London. To patch things up, he composed the famous Water Music Suite and surprised the king with a performance during a boat party down the river Thames. The King had them repeat it three times. When, in 1734, Handel made an agreement with John Walsh to start publishing his instrumental works, he quickly assembled a collection of  Six Concerti Grossi, Opus 3, from previous operas, anthems and sacred works. In 1739, he composed the Twelve Concerti Grossi, Opus 6. For this recording, I chose four movements from different concerti that seemed to fit together. For the last part of his life, Handel settled down in London for a long, successful career in mostly opera. A German by blood, he learned all the styles of different nations and became a citizen of the world, drawing not only from it's refined music, but also from popular and folk music and the "wondrous beauty of nature." He is now most famous for his great oratorio, Messiah, which is performed all across the world at Christmas and Easter.

Bach, Handel, Vivaldi and other baroque composers borrowed freely from each other to educate themselves and expand their repertoire. Johann Mattheson, a contemporary of Bach and Vivaldi and friend of Handel, describes this common borrowing: "Borrowing is not forbidden, but borrowed music must be paid back with interest. That means the copied music must be developed to create a more beautiful and better tone than the music it has been borrowed from."  Vivaldi acquired music from others for concerts at the Ospedale. His concerti seem to have greatly inspired Bach, who copied, transcribed and transformed many of them, as well as the works of other contemporaries. With the help of his wife, Anna Magdalena, Bach copied the complete score of one of Handel's oratorios for use in Leipzig. Handel occasionally borrowed from others but usually reworked and improved sections, themes or even whole movements from his own compositions, just as he did for his concerti grossi. Bach's original Oboe Concerto in D minor, BWV 1059 is missing and we only have a fragment of his reworked version for harpsichord. If he hadn't borrowed from it for a solo organ cantata, BWV 35, musicologists would not have been able to reconstruct this concerto--reworked here for the electric guitar. I used, as the second movement, the Sinfonia for Solo Oboe out of the Cantata BWV156, now famously known as "Arioso."   

This project stemmed from an idea I had in high school of exploring how Baroque music might sound if it also included some of today's instruments, especially electric guitar. Now, after twenty years of studying, practicing, and recording all six of Bach's cello suites, I decided to have a go at it. I used a modern American-made Fender Stratocaster electric guitar and a Fender Jazz electric bass. The classical guitar and viola were built by my knowledgeable friend and neighbor in Bellingham, Dake Traphagen, and I used a 200 year-old German violin and a nearly 300 year-old Italian cello, both with modern set ups. Although I love the period recordings on authentic instruments, this is a modern mix of old and current instruments at modern pitch. My late, very fine cello teacher, Barton Frank, used to say "they improved instruments for a reason."

Read more… close

The Crossing

Matt Rehfeldt

The Crossing is a passionate yet progressive shredding guitar instrumental about crossing stormy waters and keeping the faith, dedicated to my King and my family.

Matthew Rehfeldt, cellist and guitarist, was born into a musical family. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Redlands with a major in cello performance and a minor in classical guitar. He studied cello with Rick Mooney, Joyce Getting (U of R), Barton Frank, Ray Davis (principal cello, Seattle Symphony) and guitar with Terry Graves (De Falla Trio). Matthew was honored with the University of Redlands Most Outstanding Performer Award and was also winner of the Redlands Bowl Competition. He has performed as featured soloist with the University of Redlands Chamber Orchestra and twice with the Skagit Symphony, including their Opening Night at McIntyre performance.

A chamber music enthusiast, Matthew has frequently been featured as soloist and collaborator in the First Sunday at St. Paul's and the Music for a Starry Night concert series', both in Mount Vernon, WA, and the LaConner Institute of Performing Arts concert series. In 2007, Matt was invited to perform as an international soloist and chamber musician in the Monteverde Music Festival in Costa Rica. In 2009, he was featured live performing on cello and guitar for National public radio with violinist Anna Schaad. He is a cofounding member of Trio Lumina and founder of the Bach to Rock concert series.

Mr. Rehfeldt has held the post of principal cellist for the Southern California Youth Orchestra, Claremont Young Musicians' Orchestra, University of Redlands Chamber Orchestra, Mancini Symphony of the Desert, Cascade Symphony, Skagit Opera, and is currently principal cellist for the Starry Night Chamber Orchestra. Matt teaches cello and guitar out of his private home studio and is currently a freelance cellist and guitarist performing regularly as soloist, principal cellist, and chamber musician throughout Western Washington and abroad. Mr. Rehfeldt has recently released a highly acclaimed CD set of all six Bach Suites for Solo Cello.

Read more… close
0:00 / ???
  1. 1
    0:00 / 4:49

Bach Cello Suites

Matt Rehfeldt

The deep and rich tones of Matt's 1724 Italian cello take you on a smooth, soothing and heart-felt journey through Bach's amazing Suites for Cello Solo. 10% from the sale of each CD is donated to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

Matthew Rehfeldt, cellist and guitarist, was born into a musical family. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Redlands with a major in cello performance and a minor in classical guitar. He studied cello with Rick Mooney, Joyce Getting (U of R), Barton Frank, Ray Davis (principal cello, Seattle Symphony) and guitar with Terry Graves (De Falla Trio). Matthew was honored with the University of Redlands Most Outstanding Performer Award and was also winner of the Redlands Bowl Competition. He has performed as featured soloist with the University of Redlands Chamber Orchestra, the Whatcom Symphony and twice with the Skagit Symphony, including their Opening Night at McIntyre performance. A chamber music enthusiast, Matthew has frequently been featured as soloist and collaborator in the First Sunday at St. Paul's and the Music for a Starry Night concert series', both in Mount Vernon, WA, and the LaConner Institute of Performing Arts concert series. In 2007, Matt was invited to perform as an international soloist and chamber musician in the Monteverde Music Festival in Costa Rica. In 2009, he was featured live on cello and guitar on National public radio. He is a cofounding member of Trio Lumina. Mr. Rehfeldt has held the post of principal cellist for the Southern California Youth Orchestra, Claremont Young Musicians' Orchestra, University of Redlands Chamber Orchestra, Mancini Symphony of the Desert, Cascade Symphony, Skagit Opera, and is currently principal cellist for the Starry Night Chamber Orchestra. Matt has recently rediscovered his love of teaching as an instructor at the Peterson International Music School and out of his private home studio. He is currently a freelance cellist and guitarist performing regularly as soloist, principal cellist, and chamber musician throughout Western Washington and abroad. Mr. Rehfeldt has recently released on CD a highly acclaimed recording of all six Bach Suites for Solo Cello

Read more… close